2018 Half Time Report

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I am rather surprised that the first half of 2018 has had a rather good share of quality films, nearly breaking the tradition of having mainly bad films in the first half of a year. It actually made me realize that while I can make a top five of the year so far, I could not do a bottom five (for it would include films I actually enjoy).

That being said, such good movies like Deadpool 2, A Quiet Place, Incredibles 2, Ready Player One, and Set it Up did not make the list.

First, the bottom three…

 

3. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

After the nice revival of the series in 2015, we are given this let down. Nice visuals, but way too many plot turns and clichés that make you shake your head rather than nod.

2. Irreplaceable you

It is rather sad when there is a romantic movie that tries hard to bring the tears and fails. Too many characters making choices that are really difficult to relate to, let alone agree with.

1. The Cloverfield Paradox

Credit to the film makers for keeping this project a secret up until the release right after the Superbowl. That is really the only positive I can think of. I have not seen any of the other Cloverfield films, but it still does not hide what a waste of time and money this was.

 

Note: The last two films mentioned star actress Gugu Mbatha-Raw. I point this out because I wish to say she is talented, and I hope she gets better material soon.)

 

Now the best so far…

5. Isle of Dogs

Leave it to Wes Anderson to, as always, give us as fresh an original movie as possible. It is weird, quirky, funny, touching, and has Bill Murray. So, you know, a basic Wes Anderson film.

4. Black Panther

Easily one of Marvel’s top films, the kingdom of Wakanda gives us some of the best action, grit, and realism we have seen in any action film. All the cast is wonderful.

3. Avengers: Infinity War

As if the previous film were not enough, Marvel then proceeded to give us the best comic book movie since The Dark Knight. Seriously, think of how bad this movie could have been, and yet there is hardly a fault. Regardless of how you feel, there is no doubt of the wonderful, terrifying screen presence of Thanos (Josh Brolin is definitely having a good 2018).

2. Hereditary

This horror thriller reminded me a lot of 2016’s unseen gem The Witch. With a stellar cast (mainly Toni Colette), this film leaves a taste that I have still not fully gotten out of my system. I don’t think I want to either.

1. Won’t you be my Neighbor?

We still have more action packed films (comic book or otherwise) to endure this year, but they did not come much more humble and respected than Fred Rogers (who took me years to realize his first name). A documentary that is sure to bring tears and cheers, it is as necessary a film as the world needs these days. Like Hereditary, it will leave a taste (albeit a much warmer and comfortable one) in your bones and soul that will not leave you (not to mention make you feel somewhat guilty for the parodies Rogers had to suffer).

 

Now to the second half of 2018…

 

 

Won’t you be my Neighbor? (2018)

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“I like you Mister Rogers.”

I was one of the last of the Mister Rogers generation, toward the end of one of the great running children shows in history, probably second only to Sesame Street (which Rogers himself guess starred on). Won’t you be my Neighbor? is not the biography of the man Fred Rogers, but of the show he brought to countless kids, and, more important, the ideals it presented.

Director Morgan Neville (Oscar winner for 30 Feet from Stardom) starts when Rogers had the idea of the project. After his first show fell thru, the one we all know started in 1968, going up until August of 2001 (not including a response he made to the 9/11 attacks). We see interviews from those who knew and worked with him, including his wife and two sons. One of the key questions asked is if he was in real life the way he acted on screen, to which one of his sons answers, “Yes.”

 

Fred Rogers was not without his sense of humor. There are clips of subtle pranks pulled on him such as putting on the wrong pair of shoes, and a photo that made its way into his camera (for which his response is golden). Still, the determination in this mans mind and eyes are evident every time he was on screen. For me, the most powerful scene is when we see Rogers before the Senate explaining why money is necessary for what would become PBS. If the words don’t impact you, the reaction from Senator John Pastore will.

Another powerful part of the film is the story of a child named Jeff Erlanger. Anyone familiar with Rogers should know the name, but I still won’t say more, because the scene is mesmerizing on its own power.

(If you haven’t guessed by now, tears are going to happen in the course of this film, and maybe after).

Parents, there is some swearing from some of the people being interviewed, and we do see some of Eddie Murphy’s famous “Mr. Robinson” parody from SNL and one from Johnny Carson. Some of the kids in the theater I was at were laughing, though I doubt they understood all of it. I would say middle pre-teen and up.

It is rather ironic for a man as revered as Fred Rogers to know that he absolutly hated TV. It was that main reason why the ordained minister started the show in the first place. It has been fifteen years since his death, but it is beyond clear that his lessons and ideals will live on as long as people look for them.

If there was ever a movie we needed these days, it is this one.

Heck, the title itself is a question we need to ask more.

Overall: Four and a Half Stars **** 1/2